Potty Training for Preschool

 

Elementary pupils sitting on the floor in a classroom

Your child is starting preschool. Hopefully, your child is potty trained by now, but it might be that your child might not be quite ready yet. It’s natural, and not unusual, to feel a sense of panic if your child isn’t completely potty trained yet. Give yourself plenty of time to potty train your child prior to your child attending preschool. Feeling rushed is not a good way to start! Figure out a schedule to train your child before that first day of preschool. Plan for success. 

Most preschools expect that children attending the preschool will be potty trained. 70 percent of parents believe that children should be potty trained prior to going to preschool. Before selecting a preschool, ask about the potty training policy. If your child is not ready for potty training and you desire a preschool setting for your child look around as not all preschools require potty trained students. 

If being potty trained is required for the preschool that you want your child to attend, carefully consider if your child is developmentally ready to be potty trained. If your child is able to keep her diaper dry for an hour, then she’s likely ready to begin training. Another sign that your child is ready to potty train is a desire to wear underwear.  In addition, your child may be bothered by wet or soiled diapers. A desire to use the potty chair is extremely helpful!

Fully potty trained means that the child knows when he or she has to use the bathroom and does not need any assistance in the bathroom. However, preschool staff will be prepared for the occasional accident and don’t expect children to ask every time they need the toilet. Most preschools have a policy of offering gentle reminders. They will encourage children to use the toilet after meals or half an hour after having a drink. Children tend to learn by example and encourage each other. If your child consistently sees friends use a potty or toilet, most likely your child will want to join in.

cropped-amaija-photo-4-3-16-6-52-pmIf you are potty training your child at home prior to attending preschool, please refer to some of the AskThePottyFairy.blog articles that provide information on a variety of methods, gender differences and how to incorporate The Potty Fairy into your plan. The Potty Fairy enhances all methods of potty training!

Most kids will be ready between 2 and 4  — so at 3 your child could go either way. If your child is not showing signs of readiness, potty training is likely to be frustrating. If that’s the case, or if he just isn’t getting the hang of it or is feeling upset, back off. Wait at least a couple of weeks before you try again. But don’t lose hope. It’s not uncommon for a child who wasn’t using the toilet in one month, maybe potty trained the following month. You just never know what’ll do the trick. The Potty Fairy visiting is a great motivator!

If your child goes to a daycare prior to attending preschool, many daycares provide potty training assistance. It is important to work together towards the goal of potty training your child. Find out what strategies your daycare is using and provide a transition home that supports the same strategies.

Common Daycare Potty Training Approach:

Persuading a toddler to first sit on the potty. Some children are scared, and others are just not interested.  Often times daycare providers will have children who are already trained come into the bathroom and demonstrate going to the bathroom for the child that is learning.  This can be a powerful motivator, especially if they are friends.  After the friend shows how they use the bathroom, the untrained child will give it a try. Consistency is important.

Daycares also teach a child how to pull down their pants and pull them back up when they have gone to the bathroom.  They learn to flush the toilet and wash their hands.  The daycare providers work at making the child as independent as possible and help them take control of the process. This helps children feel less fearful about using the bathroom.

Potty training books are important at daycares. The Potty Fairy has been used in the daycare setting successfully. Because The Potty Fairy is an e-book and a kindle or i-pad device is used to read it, provides a sanitary situation as the device can be disinfected more easily than a regular book.

If potty training at home, or supporting the daycares strategies, try this at home: Teach your child the steps of going to the bathroom, 1. Pulling pants down before using the potty chair, 2. Pulling pants up when done using the bathroom. 3. Flushing the toilet. 4. Washing your hands.  If your child is resistant, ask an older sibling or cousin or friend if they can show the potty training child how to use the potty chair.

Types of potty chairs

Typically daycares use the toilets that are installed in the school.  They make adjustments for the child necessary to use the toilet. Daycares rarely use toilet chair inserts or small potty chairs because they are hard to keep clean.

At home you can bring in some nurturing additions to enhance the potty training process by adding a toilet seat insert or a small potty chair. These can be individualized with stickers and decorated by your child to help make it their own.

Accidents will happen

In most daycares, a child’s accident is not a big deal. A quick cleanup is completed and the child is changed into clean clothes and they move on.

Daycare providers see occasional accidents as part of the potty training process.

At home try not to make a big deal of accidents either. Clean up your child up and do not punish them or get upset when an accident occurs.  You can take more individual time to talk to your child regarding how you might make things better for them.

Positive Reward and Praise

Daycares often keep a sticker chart in the bathroom. They often times make it a part of the child’s routine when using the bathroom by letting them place the sticker on the chart. 

At home, your praise, a hug and sharing with other family members goes a long way.  Giving your child rewards or stickers is best when you “catch them being dry”. 

Scheduling

Daycares typically have a potty schedule and this usually includes a routine of 4 times per day.  Set your potty schedule at home according to the one at your child’s daycare. 

What to wear

Daycares recommend that potty training children go straight to underwear and do not recommend training diapers or pull-ups.

At home buy your child special underwear.  Have The Potty Fairy deliver them at night so that your child finds them in the morning.  Purchase underwear with your child’s favorite character on them.  Your child will not want to wet them!

Looking out for poop

Daycare staff knows that a child learns how to poop after they learn to pee in the potty chair.  As well, often times children will wait until they get home to go poop.  Most daycare staff wait and watch for a child to show signs of needing to go poop and encourage them to go on the potty chair. If they do go poop, lots of praise is given and celebration.

Because most children wait to go poop when they get home, try and figure out what your child’s natural pooping routine is.  When is within the timeframe offer them a book or an i-pad/kindle to read books or play games so that they can relax and sit on the potty chair for a while.  Make sure their legs don’t dangle and give them a stool or bench to place their feet during the process. Celebrate and provide lots of praise when a child poops.  Your child will show signs of being ready to poop in the toilet when they require privacy when they poop in their diaper.

The next AskThePottyFairy.blog post will focus on using the Potty at Preschool.

Visit the Potty Fairy for products that can motivate and enhance all potty training methods.

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copyright 2018

  

  

  

  

  

  

Backyard Potty Training

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Are you interested in potty training your child in nature, but camping out in the woods is a bit too much?  Try camping in your own backyard and potty train your child there!

Bringing your child outdoors to nature brings them that much closer to The Potty Fairies, as they live in the fields and woods near your home!  The Potty Fairy and her helpers, Bud and Blossom, will love leaving incentives all over the yard and in the tent when your child stays dry and uses the potty chair.

The Bare Bottom method might just be the thing in the privacy of your own backyard.  Your child can wear an oversized tee shirt and have a bare bottom beneath the teeshirt for a quick and easy bathroom visit. Camping and potty training go hand and hand. Potty Training Camping is a fun way to train your child. Make it creative and fun.

Things to Think About When Camping with a Toddler

To prepare for a weekend potty training outdoors camping there are a few things to prepare for a successful weekend.  Overall, you will want to set-up a tent for sleeping and arrange your beds.  You will want to plan a menu for meals and snacks.  Think about entertainment and adventure. What will you do? For potty training, you will want to set-up an “outdoor” bathroom. 

More specifically:

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Get Toys Readily Available: Select some toys from the house that your child enjoys and put them in a container to stay outside with you during the duration of your “backyard camping trip”. Familiar toys might help your child feel more safe and secure with the new adventure. A new toy may help with the sense of a new adventure.  Some small camping toys would be fun including tents, children, and fairies! Glow-in-the-dark hula toys sure are fun for night time play.  Plan on using balance bikes or trikes. I made little art bins for each of them with their pencils, pastels, crayons.

Prepare a First Aid Kit:  Prepackaged first aid kits are cheaper than buying everything.  With backyard camping, you may just want to have a few bandaids ready and insect sting lotion. Cleansing wipes are a most and you will want a lot of those. A few containers are nice and portable one if you are taking a hike or a bike ride.

Get a Potty Chair: If you are focusing on potty training you will want to have a portable potty.  It might be fun to set-up a “magical” spot for going to the bathroom.  A sheet hung on the rope could create walls around the potty chair. Balloons, streamers, and decorations could help make going to the bathroom special and exciting. If using diapers at night, an extra large Ziploc bags are helpful to put wet diapers in until you can wash them or put them in a garbage.

Snacks are a Must: Have favorite easy to serve snacks available particularly when it gets close to making meals so that you can tend to cook outside.  Children are very busy and will burn a lot of energy when outside for long periods of time. Be sure to have healthy snacks that will keep them going.

Protect your Child: Sunburns and bug bites can happen even if you are just in your backyard!  Be sure to remember sunscreen and bug spray.  A sunburn and bugs can make a camping experience negative quickly. Choose your products carefully and be sure they are recommended for the sensitive skin of a child. 

Pack and Play or Baby Gate: A “Pack and Play” may also be helpful for times that you need to contain your child.  I have also seen some people place a baby gate all around the tent so that their child stays safe and can play.  If you bring a gate to create a play area, an old rug or mat would help create a cleaner place to play. An outdoor rug is nice as it can be hosed off to keep it clean.

Don’t be restricted to the campsite or the backyard: Toddlers can get bored with if there is nothing to do.  Try and plan an outing each day for a hike, bike ride, swimming or playground.

IMG_5336 (1)Fun in the Yard: A nature scavenger hunt is always fun! Go to the Dollar Store and find some inexpensive toys that can be hidden outside, found and played with!  Pool toys are particularly fun if you have put up a swimming pool set up for your little one to take a dip. Add some bubbles and flowers to create a fairy pool. 

 

Nighttime Fun: Plan on having a campfire. Camp chairs are fun to have and there are little ones made just for little tots. Remember to roast marshmallows. Sing songs and tell stories. Cook your food over the campfire: Campfire pizzas, campfire roasted hotdogs, and sausages cooked on sticks.  Hamburger, potatoes, and carrots cooked in tinfoil, oatmeal, bacon, and eggs, sandwiches. Keep it simple, Have fun.

IMG_5304Practice Sleeping in a Tent: Before actually sleeping in the tent, set it up with sleeping bags and mats etc.  Sleeping in the backyard is certainly good practice for when you do head to campgrounds or the woods.  Getting a small swimming pool with blow-up sides works nicely for toddlers sleeping in a tent for the first time.  Add a sleeping pad to the bottom, pillows, and blankets and you have created a safe and comfortable sleeping spot. A favorite blanket or stuffed animal is also welcome.  Put your potty training child in diapers at night.  Night time bathroom trips are tough.

Nighttime Awake Time:  Make a plan on how you will handle it if your child wakes up during the night and starts crying.  Consider bringing a portable nightlight so that there is a soft light.  My children always liked music so I would have your phone or computer set for some soft comforting music.  If sleeping in the “swimming pool” bed, blankets and stuffed animals should be nearby.  Be sure to watch for the fireflies and night and listen for outside noises.  Shadows on the tent wall with a flashlight and hands make for fun nighttime plays and stories. Giving your toddler a headlamp is also fun so your child can look at books while laying in their bed.

Camp with a Partner: This is must, it will save your sanity. One adult watches the kids while the other cooks or one prepares breakfast with the toddler while the other tears down camp with a baby in the pack n play. Be a team dividing up duties and everything will go a lot smoother.

Work together for a successful and fun camping experience.

 

 

Make Camping Magical: As you hike, walk, explore, try to see things through your child’s eyes. Some children love to look at bugs, other love to collect rocks, some like to look at flowers and some love to find frogs. There are so many things to look at in nature that can fill the day with wonder.

 

Some specific Potty Tips while camping:

Plan lots of potty breaks.   Don’t leave the camp until your child goes to the bathroom.  Demonstrate the need to go before leaving to your child. Once you leave, you don’t know when the next available time will come that you can use the bathroom again.

Offer Incentives: Don’t give treats for going to the bathroom but rather give treats for staying dry. Let the Potty Fairies leave treats when the day is going well and let your child find them here and there.  Let your child know that the Potty Fairies are noticing that your child is doing a great job.  Give lots of praise for what you want your child to be doing.  Catch them being good.  Share positive stories about your child’s potty training success when your child can overhear you! Gummy worms are a fun reward when camping.

Diapers are needed sometimes during potty training: Diapers in the car and at night.  For longer car rides we did opt for the diaper.  When driving in the car, wear the diapers and as soon as you arrive at the campsite, undies go back on.  At night time, have your child do a “before bedtime potty” and then put on diapers. As soon as your child wakes in the morning, have them go potty and put the undies back on.  Invite The Potty Fairies to leave a fresh pair of undies for your child at night to put on the next day. 

 

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Bring The Potty Fairy with you on your camping trip!  Download The Potty Fairy story on your device and share the story with your child while camping. Watch the magic come to life and potty training take off! Enjoy and have fun.

The Potty Fairy

Copyright June 2017

Diapers and Mother Earth

IMG_5832Once in a while, The Potty Fairy runs across some interesting and important information from other associations that care about children and our world.  Diaper Doom is just that group with an important message about disposable diapers that are highly intriguing and important for all of us to learn more about.  We hope you enjoy reading about this topic as much as we did!

Diaper Doom is our guest blogger this week:

Potty Fairy Guest Post (8) 2

At what age did you start potty training your child? If you said between the ages of 2-3, then you’re not alone… in the United States, the average age is 2 ½ years for girls and 3 years for boys. That means that if your baby was wearing disposable diapers, they were being exposed to over 50 chemicals for up to 3 years because of their soft, sensitive skin!

American babies soil 27.4 billion diapers annually and generate 7.6 billion pounds of trash… that is enough garbage to stretch to the moon and back 9 times! Plastic disposable diapers take over 500 years to biodegrade in landfills which is so long that the diaper you wore as a baby will outlive your great- great- granddaughter!

Plastic disposable diapers should be a major concern for all parents because your baby is wearing them 24/7… during a vital time in their development.

Disposable diapers are made of both polyethylene and polypropylene… or in simple terms: PLASTIC. Polypropylene is actually the same plastic that is used to make grocery bags.

Your baby’s diapers being made of plastic should be a problem to you for a number of reasons:

First, it takes one cup of crude oil to make the polyethylene plastic for one baby: that adds up to 3.4 billion gallons of oil every year to supply diapers to all babies… enough to power 5,222,000 cars!

Second, plastic retains body heat so when the plastic diaper is constantly rubbed against your baby’s skin it creates a rash.

Third, most plastic is made from fossil fuels like oil and natural gas which release toxic emissions when extracted from the earth.

Lastly, in order to make your baby’s diapers feel soft, diaper companies use a plastic softener called phthalate. It is concerning to you as a parent because of this chemical acts as an endocrine disruptor which can cause cancerous tumors, birth defects and developmental disorders in your precious baby.

The most dangerous chemical found in almost every diaper brand on the market today is dioxin: a carcinogenic chemical that is a toxic byproduct of the paper- bleaching process. In addition to cancer, dioxin has also been known to cause birth defects, skin and liver disease, and genetic damage in lab animals.

We try to protect our babies from as much as we can… but should we really have to worry about their diapers too?

Disposable diapers on the market today are scarier than attempting to potty train your baby! Do we want our children to live in a world stinking of diapers and covered in plastic? Diaper Doom is an advocate for ending the use of plastic disposable diapers because we can’t stand the stench any longer! We feel it’s time to air out the disaster that is the diaper industry! Follow @diaperdoom to keep up with our mission… something has got to change!

At what age did you start potty training your child? If you said between the ages of 2-3, then you’re not alone… in the United States, the average age is 2 1⁄2 years for girls and 3 years for boys. That means that if your baby was wearing disposable diapers, they were being exposed to over 50 chemicals for up to 3 years because of their soft, sensitive skin!

American
babies soil
27.4 billion diapers annually and generate 7.6 billion pounds of trash… that is enough garbage to stretch to the moon and back 9 times! Plastic disposable diapers take over 500 years to biodegrade in landfills which is so long that the diaper you wore as a baby will outlive your great- great- granddaughter!

Plastic disposable diapers should be a major concern for all parents because your baby is wearing them 24/7… during a vital time in their development.

Disposable diapers are made of both polyethylene and polypropylene… or in simple terms: PLASTIC. Polypropylene is actually the same plastic that is used to make grocery bags.

Your baby’s diapers being made of plastic should be a problem to you for a number of reasons:

First, it takes one cup of crude oil to make the polyethylene plastic for one baby: that adds up to 3.4 billion gallons of oil every year to supply diapers to all babies… enough to power 5,222,000 cars!

Second, plastic retains body heat so when the plastic diaper is constantly rubbed against your baby’s skin it creates a rash.

Third, most plastic is made from fossil fuels like oil and natural gas which release toxic emissions when extracted from the earth.

Lastly, in order to make your baby’s diapers feel soft, diaper companies use a plastic softener called phthalate. It is concerning to you as a parent because of this chemical acts as an endocrine disruptor which can cause cancerous tumors, birth defects and developmental disorders in your precious baby.

The most dangerous chemical found in almost every diaper brand on the market today is dioxin: a carcinogenic chemical that is a toxic byproduct of the paper- bleaching process. In addition to cancer, dioxin has also been known to cause birth defects, skin and liver disease, and genetic damage in lab animals.

We try to protect our babies from as much as we can… but should we really have to worry about their diapers too?

Disposable diapers on the market today are scarier than attempting to potty train your baby! Do we want our children to live in a world stinking of diapers and covered in plastic? Diaper Doom is an advocate for ending the use of plastic disposable diapers because we can’t stand the stench any longer! We feel it’s time to air out the disaster that is the diaper industry! Follow @diaperdoom to keep up with our mission… something has got to change!

 

SKU-001057431_COVER_unbranded.pdf

The Potty Fairy can help by supporting and motivating children to potty train. Visit The Potty Fairy for potty training products that enhance and enrich all potty training methods.

AskThePottyFairy.blog provides articles that help you potty train your child. Check out our blog site for more ideas regarding potty training.

 

 

Copyright 2017