Are Potty Training Underwear a Big Deal?

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  How important is Potty Training Underwear?

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Are underwear important when starting potty training?  YES!  Finding the right underwear that excites your child is one of the most important items to get before starting the process.

When I first started the The Potty Fairy, I made “special” homemade Potty Fairy underwear for friends who were potty training their child, thinking this would be a motivational and fun thing for toddlers when potty training.  It did seem to help! Some people even go so far and tell their children that their underwear are magical!

Later on, I purchased training pants” type underwear and placed a PF on them.  I just assumed one should use potty training underwear when potty training. But, recently I have learned that it is advised that children who are potty training should wear regular underwear. So we have made regular underwear for girls and a boys that have a PF stamped on the rear of the underwear to align with the story.  ( as pictured in this blog post)

I have learned that children love to pick out their very own special potty training underwear and often times pick-out a pair that have a special design or character that they can relates to.   Besides a potty chair, potty training underwear is the most important things to purchase prior to beginning the potty training process. 

We all like choices and this fact includes little children.  Choices make us feel motivated and positive about anything that we are getting involved with.  When we are preparing to do something challenging, choices helps us feel in control and in charge.  Giving your child the choice on what potty training underwear to select will provide that opportunity for your child and will give them some “buy-in” to start the potty training journey.  Bring them shopping and it makes it a special day,  as together you get what you need for potty training including special underwear. This will be motivating for your child. 

Of course, you will want to have your child select underwear that you believe is a quality and a type of underwear that you believe will work best for your child.  Let them select from the ones that you approve prior to shopping and guide them through the process. 

Avoid diaper like training pants as a child will think they can continue to use them as a diaper! Pull-ups are not helpful in potty training as if the child has an accident, the pull-up does not make the child feel wet and your child will not feel the consequences of having an accident.  For people who prefer the training pant style underwear,  there are training pants that are designed so that the child will feel wet and uncomfortable but will guard the child’s clothing from getting wet.

In the beginning stages of potty training you will want to let your child wear their new underwear when at home.   When your child wears their underwear, they will see that when they have have an accident, their underwear will get wet,  and their clothing will need to be changed.  It is a process that helps them to understand, if they want to stay dry, they need to get to the bathroom before an accident occurs.  When just beginning to potty train, some suggest putting on a diaper or thick training pants when leaving home, until your child is staying drying and using the bathroom regularly.  Shorter trips out, helps them practice staying dry when not at home. 

Training pants are different from regular underwear as they are a bit thicker and will help in case of an accident. If you decide you want to use training pants, the cloth cotton training pants are thicker than regular underwear or panties and there is extra padding in the crotch area where an accident may occur.  They come in:

  • a variety of colors and designs for boys and girls.
  • a variety of sizes. 
  • very easy to pull up and down for potty training.

In addition, waterproof pull-on pants can be purchased to put over the cloth underwear in case of an accident. The waterproof pull-on pants will help protect your furniture and floors from getting wet when they do have an accident. The waterproof pull-on pants will protect should the child have an accident while on an outing, as well as during the daytime.

boy underwearThere are also training pants with a “pocket” opening so that you can add additional material to add additional absorbency for overnight or if traveling.  Parents have told me that they believe that their child was more apt to wet their pants as they felt like diapers when using this type of underpants.

One mom even told me that her child did not train using “tighty whities” underwear and she felt that this style was too much like a diaper for her child.  She struggled potty training her son when using “tighty whities”  and when she put him in boxer underwear he trained quickly as there was no room for error.

Many people have concluded that training pants need to be much like real underwear in order for proper potty training to happen.  This means your child should be able to pull them up and down easily.  Get the cutest underwear that you can find with your child so they will want to wear them and will not want to mess them up.  Consider getting a pair that is one size up from your child’s typical size is very helpful when potty training very easy of pulling up and down.

Many daycares are recommending to parents to go straight to regular underwear when you are ready to potty train.  Just remember that underwear is a BIG deal to a child and you want to let them pick them out.

In “The Potty Fairy” story, the potty fairies deliver the underwear at night, underwear that the Potty Fairy has stamped in the rear and leave them on the bed for the child to find in the morning.  This concept adds some imaginative play to the process and excitement! We all love special deliveries!IMG_7157- front cover of bookThe Potty Fairy

Copyright 2018

 

Potty Training and the Holidays

 

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Potty Training Holiday Tips

You may not be actually potty training during the holidays, but you might be in that 3- month period after potty training when extra support is needed to keep your little one on track with using the potty chair.

Here are some helpful reminders with the holiday season upon us:

Organize the right supplies be ready to go when heading out.  You may want some disposable diapers available should you be traveling, or if you are attending holiday events in places that are not familiar to you and your child.  Think about packing a “toddler bag” with extra underwear, outfits, and disposable diapers.

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Bathrooms can be an issue when not at home.  I found this particularly true with going poop for my children.  They were going to save it for home!  Well, if you are going to be gone during the holidays for a few days that could be a problem.  Talk to your child before leaving home to give them advance warning regarding using a different bathroom when away from home.  For some children, bringing you potty chair from home can help.  Or even a smaller add-on toilet seat that is familiar to them.   Having one of these items available will be worthwhile when visiting relatives or friends for a few days.  Shopping or theater events are yet another issue.  Public bathrooms can really bring on the anxiety.  I found family bathrooms helpful for a little-added privacy. Bringing that small add-on seat for a public bathroom toilet can also help.  If it is all too much for your child, you may find yourself resorting to disposable pull-ups for a brief time.

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Holiday apparel is so adorable and fun.  Before you decide what to put on your child for the holidays, think about your child managing the clothing during potty time.  Lacy, fluffy dresses maybe a bit too much for your newly potty trained daughter to deal with on the potty chair.  Fancy outfits for boys with belts and suspenders could take time to undo and create an accident ready to happen.  If your child is newly potty trained select an outfit that will be easy for your child to deal with this year.  Easy on and easy off.  Fancy outfits may need to wait for another year.

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All of our diets change during the holidays.  We all eat a little more and drink a little more during socializing with others.  More to eat and drink could lead to tummy aches and could also create a situation where your child may need to visit the potty chair more often. Many parents will limit the number of liquids their child drinks before naps and bedtime.  Try to manage how much your child is eating and drinking. Be aware of the extra sugar in the food. Consider bringing some familiar foods for your child to eat and drink so that there is some regularity during this time.

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When you are home, there is a typical schedule that you follow with your child. When the holidays arrive with more travel and added events and parties, your schedule is challenging to follow. It may be impossible to follow your child’s typical schedule. Realizing your child schedule is not being followed, as usual, try and include extra chances to rest and go to the bathroom.  Be sensitive to your child’s needs and try not to get stressed out. Anticipating these things ahead of time and being prepared is helpful and could save the day. 

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 There will be lots of distractions and it will be easy to lose track of time.  Try and stay as consistent as possible with ALL the distractions that will be occurring all around you.  Timers can help you keep on track with going to the bathroom.  There are a variety of AP’s available for your phone so that you can set a timer to remind you of potty time, snacks and naps. This could be helpful for staying on schedule with distractions.

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Knowing that the holidays can be stressful at home or on the road, try and keep your cool and remain patient.  Realizing that the holidays are stressful for you, recognize that holidays are also stressful for your child.  Your child may regress during this time.  Regression is common during transitional times,  and holiday schedules can sure make life busy and in constant transition.  Be patient with yourself and be patient with your child.  Your child may go regress with potty training during this time, even during the best of circumstances. Don’t panic.  Just know when the holidays are over, you can get back on track. You may need a short period of time revisiting potty training with rewards, reminders, and praise when the holidays are over.  If you realize this is a possibility and you have a plan in place, you will likely ride the tide a little easier. Bringing a few items that help to calm your child as these items will be helpful for calming your child when not at home too.  Special toys, blankets, and books can help ease anxiety and help in a tense situation. 

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Being prepared for the holidays when it comes to potty training can help you enjoy the holidays and be ready for what might come up. Being prepared and aware is half of the battle. Compassion for your child and yourself will help ease the anxiety.  Enjoy the holidays and realize the holidays will pass too.  Your regular schedule will return and your child will get back on track with potty training too.

 

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The New Year will bring so much to celebrate and enjoy with your child.  Why some of your experiences could help you figure out some New Year’s Resolutions!  Keep your sense of humor. Cheers!

Copyright 11/2017

Visit The Potty Fairy for more potty training information and ideas this holiday season.IMG_7157- front cover of book

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Potty Training Multiples

Two twins babies boys wearing glasses.

When we first started the AskThePottyFairy.blog, we wondered how many potty training topics there would be to write about and share on our blog.  We are amazed at the number of topics associated with potty training and look forward to another year of providing blog posts as there is always more to learn.  The questions and topics keep rolling in! Consider following the AskThePottyFairy.blog so that you are alerted when new blogs are posted!

Coming up in November, The Potty Fairy has been asked to provide a potty training session for a group of parents in Toronto, Canada (TROMBA)   The Potty Fairy will be offering a webinar conference for the Toronto Parents of Multiple Births Association. Registrations are coming in and we are expecting a large group who will login in to participate in this session! In preparation for this specific webinar training, we are offering a blog post this month focusing on “Potty Training Multiples”. 

Note: If you are interested in offering a webinar training on potty training for your association, please send us an email and we would be happy to accommodate your specific interests and ideas.

Potty Training Multiples

So the big questions for parents of multiples are how do I potty train twins, triplets or more?  How do I differentiate typical training for one child to accommodate more than one child?  What if one of the children I am training is succeeding and the other is not? How do I keep both on track and feeling positive?  How do I organize for potty training and accommodate for more than one?

Parents of twins, triplets or more typically feel very overwhelmed when it comes to potty training their children. I would say that parents of one are also overwhelmed, but potentially double that for parents of twins and triplets.  Parents of multiple children are capable of this task as everything they do requires more organization and the ability to handle more chaos. So with a bit more preparation, support, and solid understanding, parents of multiples will conquer potty training! ( Kinda superhuman parents)

Parents of multiple children, please read on…

First, as with all parents potty training your children, you will want to make sure you are ready for the task and schedule potty training at a time with the least amount of distraction and stress. You will want to schedule potty training when you get another adult to commit to the training session alongside of you. Two people are needed when training multiple children. Prepare for success.

Secondly, you will want to be sure your children are developmentally ready for potty training. Typically, 2 1/2 to 3 years old. As with everything, this is an average, and some children potty train earlier and some later. With multiples, I would consider observing when both or all children demonstrate readiness for better odds for success and streamlining the process for you and your family.

Third, review the Methods of Potty Training on the AskThePottyFairy.blog site.  There are a variety of methods and approaches. You may want to look elsewhere for a review of methods as well. Read, reflect, consider and decide which method makes the best sense for you to use.  Just make a decision about your “game plan” and go from there.  You will add some unique differentiation for your children but have a base plan.

Next, prepare your environment and when getting your equipment purchase more than one potty chair.  Some people suggest letting your children have their own special potty chair, and some say no. You will have to make a decision on that one! (Personally, I would let them have their own and let them make it uniquely theirs.) Have multiple potty chairs and perhaps in more than one location.  Don’t forget to make accommodations for your home such as covering furniture, removing rugs and such.

Download a free Top Twelve Potty Training Tips sheet on the website and hang on the refrigerator for a reminder and reference. Add these “Potty Training Multiples Tips”:

DON’T compare

DON’T pressure

DO be patient

Do individualize for differences

Unique for training multiples, you will want to individualize your method for learning styles, motivational rewards and gender differences of your twins, or triplets. Think about how you would like to differentiate for these differences for your multiple children.  Learning styles and motivational rewards can be different for boys and girls along with anatomy differences.  Accommodate for these differences.  The method you proceed with will have unique differences for each of your children.

There is always the notion that the twins could be a positive influence on each other and be using the potty chair.  Keep it fun, positive and individualized you will be sure to be successful.  It has been said that twins can motivate each other in the process.

Unique “Potty Training Multiples” Issues:

What to do if one twin is making progress and the other is not?  To hold one back because the other is not making progress does not make sense.  I would move forward with the twin that is making progress and let them potty in the potty chair.  I would diaper up the uninterested child and not make a big deal of it.  Typically, the second or third child will catch-up pretty quickly.

DON’T feel you have to potty train your twins at the same time. Some twins, especially boy/girl sets, learn to use the toilet as much as a year apart — and that’s okay. All kids are different (even if yours look a lot alike). Still, lots of parents decide to tandem toilet train as soon as one seems ready so as not to prolong the process. And if things go well, the less eager twin will show more interest when she sees her sib using a potty.

How to manage Reward and praise as to not compare? Try to manage each of the children individually and not comparatively. Look for positives in both. Minimize accidents and setbacks.

DON’T use charts when you potty train twins. Charts show an obvious comparison between your children. One or two stickers are a great reward — with any luck, both kids will be getting their share — but putting them on a chart can be a constant visual reminder to one twin that she’s “behind” the other. Let them use their stickers in a different way so comparisons are lessened or eliminated.

DON’T use one twin’s potty success to encourage the other. The twin who’s taking his time with potty training will be able to figure out the progress of his sibling without you pointing it out. Instead of being motivating, comparisons might intensify feelings of jealousy or competition. Learning quickly doesn’t have to be the “better” way to learn to use the potty chair.  Praising your children for different attributes can make both of them feel successful and good about themselves.

I share this post with all due respect for parents of twins and triplets or more.  I look forward to the conversation we will have at the end of the webinar and realize there is always more to consider and learn.  I am hoping to learn together with you that evening. After the webinar and our discussion, I am visualizing adding more to this particular post as I learn from you. Please feel free to leave comments on the blog too and we can start the conversation early!

And “The Potty Fairy” Enhances All Methods of Potty Training, Even for Multiples!!!

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Copyright October 2017

 

Potty Training Around the World

Kids around EarthAround the world, 50% of children are potty trained by 12 months.  This is not typical in the United States where we wait for the child to get much older before potty training. Typical ages in the United States are 2 and 1/2 for girls and 3 years for boys. So is potty training a child development issue or is it more of a cultural issue?  Let’s take a look.

Parents the world over share the challenge of potty training and look forward to having a clean and dry baby who goes to the potty in an appropriate manner. Different cultures, as well as different families, have diverse expectations of what an infant or a toddler should be doing at any given stage of development, and potty training is no exception.

In the United States, since the late 1950s, when the washing machine was found in most homes,  and the disposable diapers became available, potty training children were most often started later in a child’s early childhood years.  The convenience of the washing machine and disposable diapers and child psychologist, Dr. Brazelton, who changed the age of a child potty training from 12 months to 3 years, modified potty training in the United States. Since the 1950s potty training, a child later and later in childhood has grown.  Companies that make disposable diapers produce larger and larger diapers to support the idea of potty training a child later in childhood.  We are getting more and more comfortable waiting a long time before potty training U.S. children.

However, the United States also has a diverse population, who embraces several different approaches to potty training. Different methods are available and the parent decides what works best for their child and family. Although the majority of U.S. parents watch for signs of readiness and then let their toddler set the pace. Parents often use special children’s books, games, and potty chairs to encourage their child’s cooperation and progress with potty training. They may also use positive reinforcement techniques such as rewards to get results. Most children are completely potty-trained between the ages of 2 to 3 years old.

Some unique ideas from around the world regarding potty training:

Kids in China wear a onesie-style outfit with a split crotch. If a kid indicates that they need to go to the bathroom, the parents open up the slit and hold the child away from themselves and the kids go on the ground. It doesn’t seem to matter where they are or what they were doing.

In Germany, kids are potty trained by age 3 because it is a requirement for starting school. Germans emphasize cleanliness in the potty training process and boys and girls are taught to sit down on the potty as it is considered cleaner.

In the Netherlands children are potty trained between 2-3 years old in groups at daycare. There are little toilets and pots that all the kids use together, then they fill out sticker charts. Parents and daycare providers work together when the kids are ready and the process goes smoothly. Kids must be trained by age four before they start school full time.

In rural Indonesia, potty training isn’t even a word. Diapers are expensive and babies are free to urinate wherever they are standing or placed. Mothers and grandmothers just do a swift clean-up after.

In Pakistan, kids are free to run around and pee wherever they want. Moms give them a bath at night to clean them up, the children wear diapers at night when they sleep and in the morning, the diapers are taken off and the children are ready for the day. Eventually, they learn to recognize the urge and use the toilet.

In Sudan, potty training is done early. It helps that these mothers carry their babies on their backs often, so they either must figure out how to read their baby’s signals. By age 2, most kids are potty trained, except those who can afford diapers.

In Kenya and Tanzania, parents start potty training infants when they are a few weeks old. Since there is nearly always someone tending babies, they are able to immediately respond to the signs of discomfort. Babies who need to eliminate are taken outside and held over the ground in an appropriate place. By the time children in Kenya and Tanzania are 5 or 6 months old, they stay dry throughout the day and night.

In India, potty training starts when a child is about 6 months old. At frequent intervals, caregivers hold babies above the latrine and toddlers are left to walk around diaperless and only wearing a shirt.  The children are praised for remaining clean and dry. The children are usually completely potty trained by the time they are 14 months old.

In Finland and many other Northern European countries, kids are routinely held over the potty after every meal from infancy onward.  Many European countries tend to leave potty training completion until about 2 years old. The older European generation believes children should be potty trained by 6 months.

Overall, it appears that culture certainly has an impact on the potty training process around the world.  In the United States, there is more diversity in the approach and method for potty training.  There also appears to be more products available for potty training.  Multiple methods provide for differentiated approaches for parents to choose from according to the family lifestyle and a child’s personality and temperament.   Ideas from around the globe are incorporated into many of the potty training methods used by United States parents.

The Potty Fairy enhances and enriches all methods of potty training.  Including the Potty Fairy in your potty training program adds a fun and imaginative approach to any method you to choose to use. The Potty Fairy 

The Potty Fairy Book is available in French, Spanish and English.  The book can be purchased on our website. You can also find it on Amazon, Barnes and Noble and other online stores.

 

Copyright 2018Book- 3 languages

The Three Day Method of Potty Training with The Potty Fairy

Three babies sitting indoors holding hands

Signs that Your Child is Ready for Potty Training: 

  • A child is independent and proud of accomplishments.
  • A child has dry periods.
  • A child does not like a dirty diaper.
  • A child notices others using the toilet.
  • A child can tell you when wetting their diaper
  • Pooping is obvious!
  • A child is interested in trying to use the toilet

 

Preparation for three-day method of potty training:

  • Get oversized tee shirts for your child to wear.
  • Get a potty chair that you can move around the house.
  • Let the Potty Fairies know that you are embarking on potty training.
  • Get The Potty Fairy book and CD.
  • Get relevant rewards that the Potty Fairies can leave.
  • Get awesome undies that can be left on your child’s bed at night to put on in the morning. Potty Fairy stickers are available to place on underwear so your child can know they are from the Potty Fairy.
  • Be ready to spend 3 intense days with your child at home. You will be together.

OK, here’s how to potty train your kid in three days:

  • When your child wakes up in the morning, change his soggy diaper and bid farewell. Have your kid throw the diaper out and say “bye-bye.”
  • Change your kid into one of the oversized T-shirts you got and explain there is no diaper to catch the pee-pee or poop, so he has to put it in the potty.
  • Give your kid breakfast and an extra drink. Afterward, lead your little one to the potty. It should be a successful trip after all those liquids.
  • Go on with the day, but remember, no leaving the house for three days. Play, read, color and watch cartoons.
  • Have a constant sippy cup of water at your kid’s reach. Just like crate-training a puppy, walk your child to the potty every 15 minutes, all day long for three days.
  • Cut off all liquids and snacks after dinner.
  • Complete one final potty mission before bed.
  • Wake your kid up halfway through the night to pee. (Yes, set an alarm.)
  • Repeat for the next two days.
  • Don’t get upset about accidents. They’re not a big deal.

Days Two and Three:

  • Repeat what you did on day one.
  • Don’t get upset about accidents. They’re not a big deal.
  • Don’t react to accidents.
  • Provide praise and rewards for staying dry.
  • Leave surprises for staying dry by the potty fairies throughout the day.
  • Make the day magical and fun.

After 3 days of successful potty training, plan a celebration:

  • Have a celebration!  It will help your child stay focused and remain “trained”.
  • Decorate a Potty Fairy Princess or Princess Crown to wear at the celebration party. (download a free crown template at www.thepottyfairy.com
  • Have your child help prepare the celebration.
  • Make cupcakes or cookies. Kids love to bake.
  • Make some decorations.
  • Have your child tell others at the celebration (family and close friends what they have accomplished!  A public announcement that they will now use underwear.
  • Let them show others their “big girl or boy” underwear.
  • This is a time that you and your child can feel proud of what you have accomplished. A time to celebrate your child as they are no longer a baby with diapers.

         Best wishes on your potty training journey!  Remember The Potty Fairy !

The Potty Fairy book is available in English, Spanish and French. All versions can be purchased on Amazon and Barnes and Noble. English versions and eBooks are available on our website at 25% of.
Book- 3 languages
Copyright 2018

Potty Training a Child With Autism

 

 

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High admiration to all the moms and dads parenting children who have autism. Your love, patience, and perseverance are that of heroes.  Your children are blessed to have you as their parent.

Recently, I joined some Potty Training Groups on Facebook, so that I could read posts from parents who are working at potty training their children.  I was interested in evaluating if the AskThePottyFairy.blog had a comprehensive list of posts for parents who may be seeking information regarding potty training.  After a few months of reviewing parent posts this summer, I have concluded that our blog has a well-rounded menu of topics regarding potty training, with the exception of one topic, “Potty Training a Child Who Has Autism”. 

CalvinI found that there were many posts from parents seeking answers to questions they had about potty training a child who had autism.  In addition to my findings from reading the posts,  on a personal level, our family includes a special boy and much-loved boy, who has autism.  Although he is potty trained, I was curious about the process for him. 

Truthfully, our little guy has been a little bit of a puzzle and a mystery for me but once I realized he was not going to be the same as what I was used to with the other kids in our family and I accepted that fact, everything changed. I learned to love him for who he is and enjoy him for who he is. I truly believe there are no limits to what he will do. He is beautifully unique, and oh, so special. The love from him in return is enormous.

 

Calvin 2For our little guy and other children with autism, potty training can be a challenge for many different reasons.  I would like to share some of what I have learned:

1.  One reason is that many children who have autism have difficulty transitioning from routines. So for potty training, the routine is using a diaper or pull-up.  Moving from a diaper to using the toilet and wearing underwear is a big break in routine that requires some effort.

2.  Another reason is that children with autism have communication challenges, which can create a barrier regarding telling someone that they need to use the bathroom.

3. As with many changes and transitions, children with autism can develop anxiety about change so anxiety around using the toilet can occur.

4. Due to sensory issues, children with autism may not get the signals that they need to go to the bathroom so nonverbal cues may not be demonstrated!  They may “go without warning” or make it difficult for caregivers to get them to the bathroom on time.

5. Children with autism have the same signs of readiness as other children.  The age that these signs show-up may not be the same as other children.

 

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Thankfully, there are some strategies that can help to address these issues that children with autism can benefit when learning to use the toilet:

1. An important first step is to realize that toilet training is largely about communication and working together with your child.

2. Visual prompts are extremely helpful. Pictures of the steps when using the toilet are helpful. Use pictures and use simple and direct messages when using visual prompts.  Visual prompts with simple directions are the most effective with no discussion. Be supportive.

3. Don’t delay the underwear! Move your child into underwear as soon as possible. This step is true for all children. 

4. When an accident occurs, minimize the accident, clean up the accident and your child and move on. Have as little conversation about the accident as possible.

5. Reward your child for success, or “catch them doing good”.  Rewards can be activities, favorite snacks, or a small toy.  Keep these as rewards, not bribes. There is a difference.

Consider including a visual picture of your child receiving a reward for successfully following all the steps. Rewards should be immediate and consistent.

6. As your child progresses in using the toilet, work at a signal he can show that means he needs to use the bathroom. Maybe a visual signal he can give you that he needs to go and may need your help.

-Perhaps you would want to put a picture of a toilet on his belt loop or shirt button hole and he could point to it when he believes he needs to go to the bathroom.

-Later, your child may show ‘body motions” to demonstrate that they need to use the bathroom and will no longer need a visual picture.

7. Definitely reward your child for any effort to communicate. Make sure the rewards you give your child are truly rewarding for your child.

Bolt with boy 3

8.  To help with anxiety, we would like to recommend a product called “The Potty Rider” to help your child feel more confident and less afraid about using the toilet.  This tool has helped many children with autism overcome the anxiety they feel when getting themselves up to the toilet seat.  “The Potty Rider” has sturdy steps that your child can use to get up to the toilet and handlebars to hang on to for added security.  The Potty Rider” comes in different styles including a motorcycle, a dinosaur, and horses.  The Potty Rider” helps children move from anxiety to having fun. The “Potty Fairy Potty Rider”, “Bolt ( black)  and Beauty(white) ” styles are available on our website  ww.thepottyfairy.com and other styles and testimonials can be found at pottyrider.com/

Finally, I would like to mention that there is a FREE download of a complete guide to potty training children with autism.  The link is here.  “Autism Potty Training-The Ultimate Guide” 

Remember The Potty Fairy book to add fun and creative imaginative play to your potty training process! Available in 3 languages! www.thepottyfairy.com

Book- 3 languages

Backyard Potty Training

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Are you interested in potty training your child in nature, but camping out in the woods is a bit too much?  Try taking potty training to your own backyard and potty train your child there!

Bringing your child outdoors to nature brings them that much closer to The Potty Fairies, as they live in the fields and woods near your home!  The Potty Fairy and her helpers, Bud and Blossom, will love leaving incentives all over the yard when your child stays dry and uses the potty chair.

The Bare Bottom method might just be the thing in the privacy of your own backyard.  Your child can wear an oversized t-shirt and have a bare bottom beneath the t-shirt for a quick and easy bathroom visit. Camping or being outside at home, and potty training go hand in hand. Potty Training outside is a fun way to train your child. Make it creative and fun.

Things to Think About When Potty Training Outside with a Toddler

To prepare for a weekend potty training outdoors, there are a few things to prepare for a successful weekend.  Overall, you will want to set-up a tent for sleeping and arrange your beds.  You will want to plan a menu for meals and snacks.  Think about entertainment and adventure. What will you do? For potty training, you will want to set-up an “outdoor” bathroom. 

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Get Toys Readily Available: Select some toys from the house that your child enjoys and put them in a container to stay outside with you during the duration of your “backyard camping trip.” 

Get a Potty Chair: If you are focusing on potty training you will want to have a portable potty.  It might be fun to set-up a “magical” spot for going to the bathroom.  A sheet hung on the rope could create walls around the potty chair. Balloons, streamers, and decorations could help make going to the bathroom special and exciting.

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Don’t be restricted to the backyard: Toddlers can get bored with if there is nothing to do, or they just want a change of scenery.  Try and plan an outing each day for a hike, bike ride, swimming or playground.

Fun in the Yard: A nature scavenger hunt is always fun! Go to the Dollar Store and find some inexpensive toys that can be hidden outside, found and played with!  Pool toys are particularly fun if you have put up a swimming pool set up for your little one to take a dip. Add some bubbles and flowers to create a fairy pool. 

Nighttime Fun: Have a campfire. Camp chairs are fun to have and there are little ones made just for little tots. Roast marshmallows, sing songs, and tell stories. Cook your food over the campfire. Get a jar and try to collect fireflies! Keep it simple. Have fun.

Make Being Outside Magical: As you hike, walk, explore, try to see things through your child’s eyes. Some children love to look at bugs, other love to collect rocks, some like to look at flowers and some love to find frogs. There are so many things to look at in nature that can fill the day with wonder.

As always, plan for lots of potty breaks.   Don’t leave the yard until your child goes to the bathroom. Encourage your toddler to go before leaving. Once you leave, you don’t know when the next available time will come that you can use the bathroom again.

 

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Bring The Potty Fairy with you on your camping trip!  Download The Potty Fairy story on your device and share the story with your child while camping. Watch the magic come to life and potty training take off! Enjoy and have fun.

The Potty Fairy

Copyright June 2017

Potty Training Regression

 

Potty trainingAs a young mom, expecting a baby and having a 2-year-old at home, I was anxious to potty train my eldest daughter before my new baby came home.  We potty trained together when my daughter was 23 months, almost 2 years old.  She seemed ready and everything went smoothly until I brought home the new baby and when my 2-year-old became a big sister to a new baby sister.  It seemed almost instantly she was having accidents and my response at the time was to put her back into diapers.  At the time I was so busy with the new baby I was challenged to also give attention to my daughter who was regressing in her potty training. 

 

Cute Happy toddler sitting on potty outdoorIt was hard for me to understand why my daughter had regressed and what had happened. She seemed to be well on her way to successfully using the potty chair! Why did she suddenly reverse direction? I felt like a failure but learned that all our efforts were not a failure, but that I needed to understand why regression happened and get to the bottom of the problem and get back on track. Once things settled in with the new baby and we were able to get a reasonable schedule again, my eldest daughter returned to being potty trained. Although it did take a little effort and focus, we did not start back to the very beginning of potty training which is what I feared.

 

girl with new babyI learned that there is not usually one reason why kids regress when it comes to potty training. Often times, during times of transition that may cause some stress at home, like welcoming a new sibling or starting a new school, regression can occur and a potty trained child returns to needing diapers.   When this happens, you need to address the problem that caused the regression to be able to move beyond the setback. Chances are, once the transition takes place and things settle down, your child will master potty training again and be back into underwear. Patience during this time will be critical in getting thru the bumps and moving forward again. I found this to be true and that my daughter actually enjoyed the attention to get back into underwear, using the potty chair and the benefits of being the “older” sister.

If in time things do not resume to normal, you may want to check in with your child’s doctor as medical issues can also cause regression. Sometimes difficulty with pooping can cause a child to avoid using the potty chair altogether.  Accessing if this can be an issue is important and be sure to offer plenty of water and a fiber-rich diet that promotes easy pooping.

boy on potty riderIf your child is expressing fear of using the toilet, play games, read books and provide aids to make using the toilet more fun.  The Potty Fairy Potty Rider, available on our website.  has been so helpful in alleviating fears about the toilet. Children who have expressed fear of falling into the toilet feel secure on the Potty Fairy Potty Rider.  The Potty Fairy book and enrichment products can also be helpful in bringing imaginative fun to the process with books, music and other enrichment products.  Bringing imaginative fun and adventure to potty training motivates children to use the potty chair.  The little guy in the picture was fearful of the toilet but with Bolt the horse to keep him secure he is all smiles. 

 

Getting back on track with potty training will require some consistent reminders to use the potty chair. Make a commitment to schedule your child’s visit to the potty chair as a part of your routine. Your child should use the toilet at least every two hours to get them back on track. To help with the transition from regression to using the potty chair again begin to give gentle reminders and encouragement to use the potty chair. Often time accidents happen because a child is busy in an activity and they do not want to stop to go and use the bathroom. 

step stoolsExplain to your child they are a big boy or girl and that they need to use the bathroom rather than use a diaper.  Remind them every hour or two and walk them to the bathroom before meals, before bedtime and before leaving the home.  In between times when needed. Have them use the bathroom right away in the morning, before m

Your response to your child when they use the potty chair successfully or have an accident can have a strong impact on their progress. You will want to give lots of positive attention to success and calm attention to accidents. If an accident occurs, quickly and quietly assist your child to clean-up and do not make a big deal.  Make big deals about success!

 

Hockey Stick or BudIncentives to stay dry are helpful. It is worth your while to brainstorm rewards that will truly be a reward for your child. The Potty Fairies love leaving incentives or rewards for your child and this helps keep the rewards, rewards and not bribes. Give rewards for staying dry not using the potty chair. After a few successful days, provide a special treat to an ice cream store or toy store with just you. A special treat with their parent all to themselves.  Praise can be a huge reward too that they are your special big boy or girl, not a baby that needs diapers can be the best reward.

 

 

If you can, keep your child in underwear, even if they are in a period of regression.  You want your child to feel discomfort when they have an accident. You don’t want revert to diapers so that your child regresses back into diapers when they have been successful at wearing underwear. Keep them moving forward as an independent potty user! Best wishes. 

 

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The Potty Training Consultant recently wrote a blog post called “Potty Training Products I Love”, which is a lovely post about her 6 favorite potty training products. “The Potty Fairy” book was included in these favorite potty training products!  Please check out this blog post and see the other products recommended by Potty Training Consultant!

 

She shares that “working with many different families with children of all ages and abilities, I am always on the lookout for products to make the potty training process easier and more fun. I wanted to share with you what I feel are the best potty training products on the market right now. Get one, or get them all for the ultimate potty training experience!”

One of her favorite products is our “The Potty Fairy” book!

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She also shares: “The Potty Fairy is a brand new potty training book that brings a fun new approach to learning how to use the potty. It features the Potty Fairy and her helpers, Bud and Blossom, who visit children during their potty training process bringing rewards and encouragement. I love that this book is a different concept than what we’ve seen in potty training books in the past and will really speak to your child’s imagination.”

 

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The Potty Fairy book is being featured on Goodreads!  Please visit this site and give The Potty Fairy a 5-star rating and sign up for the Book Giveaway!  5 Books will be given away to 5 lucky winners!  If you want to read the story before rating, send us your email address and we will send you a free eBook from the Potty Fairy! 

copyright 2018

 

Different Approaches for Different Folks

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One of the beliefs we have at The Potty Fairy is that “one size, fits all” does NOT work for potty training.  We believe that children are unique and families are unique which calls for a unique potty training plan.   Another word used for a unique approach to learning is called “differentiation”.  Differentiation means that the approach to learning is different or individualized for each child, so that individual needs are met and the learning environment is specific and targeted.

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Differentiated potty training could be thought of being like baking a cake.  We all might decide to bake a cake but does that mean we all bake the same flavor?  Do we all back the same shape? Do we all put on the same kind of frosting?  The cake itself could be a symbol of potty training. We are all going to potty train.  The flavor of the cake could be associated with the method we might choose to potty train.  The shape of the cake might be the individualized plan we add to the method for potty training our child based on our child and our families lifestyle.  The frosting on the cake could be thought of like the rewards, motivators, and ways we celebrate our child’s success.  Make sense?

 

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The Potty Fairy products we offer are enrichment and enhancement products or the “frosting” or decorations on the cake.  The Potty Fairy offers books, dolls, tee shirts, underwear, stickers, crowns and The Potty Fairy Potty Rider.  We are planning to add a few more fun treats too! We bring in the imaginative play world that children love to learn in thru our book, song, fun clothing, and toys.  

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The Potty Fairy also shares this blog and we have posted 35 plus posts that target potty training topics to help you decide what your unique potty training plan will be. Our webinar potty training has been popular for larger groups of people who want to learn together. During the webinar, parents are presented lots of information and together we develop individualized plans. After our presentation, we have an open discussion and Q/A time.  Our webinar presentations are followed by email conversations for those parents who are interested in further discussion. 

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There has been a space in our outreach that has not been filled. There have been requests for individual consultation which we have not been able to provide for parents other than email correspondence.  Then we met, Allison Jandu, who is a Potty Training Consultant and specializes in Custom Potty Training Plans to fit any family’s needs!  She also has a blog. We reached out to Allison and asked her co-author the blog post this month so you could meet her.  We are so very excited to introduce you to Allison!

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As a professional consultant having worked with countless families to potty train their children, including my own two, I can tell you that there is no one-size-fits-all potty training method. Every child is different. My son, who is older, took a very casual approach to potty training. He was willing to follow direction and was eager to learn. My daughter, on the other hand, is very independent and headstrong, so I had to take an entirely different approach when potty training her. This is a perfect example of what works for one child, might not work for the next. So many factors contribute to how your child will learn including age, personality, your family’s lifestyle, and medical or developmental issues.

Not only is every child different, but every parenting style is different. Chances are you won’t always agree with every single aspect of one particular potty training plan. Then what? How do you change it to match your lifestyle? If you change one thing, will everything else still work? Getting your own individual plan avoids all of these questions and allows the potty training process to blend seamlessly into your lives with minimal disruption.

We all want the process to go as smoothly and quickly as possible, not just for our child’s sake, but for our own! This is why being prepared with a customized potty training plan is so important. When you are armed with the proper plan and STICK WITH IT, potty training is almost always a success.  It is also very important to have a strong support system in place for you during the process and for your child after the process. When you work with a consultant, you have a wealth of knowledge about potty training at your disposal for any questions or roadblocks you encounter as you go.

So, maybe you have no idea where to start. Maybe you tried potty training before without success and went back to diapers. Maybe after potty training your first child, you are dreading attempting it again. Working with a consultant and having an individualized plan going in really sets your child up for success. It also makes the process a lot easier on you – and who doesn’t want that!

Contact me today to find out how to get a custom potty training plan in the works for your child.

Allison Jandu

Potty Training Consultant

pottytrainingconsultant@gmail.com

www.pottytrainingconsultant.com

PTC

The Potty Fairy @ www.thepottyfairy.com

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Copyright 2018

Nighttime Potty Training

The Last Step: Nighttime Potty Training

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It is nighttime and your child is sleeping and you are going to go to bed. How will your child remember to use the potty chair during the night? You are not there to remind them. They are on their own.  Before deciding it is time to prepare your child for nighttime potty training let’s look at some information to consider before making your decision to start.

Most likely you have daytime potty trained your child sometime between the 2 years old and 3 years old time period.  Now that your child has the daytime potty training in place when is it time to consider nighttime potty training?   It is very common for the nighttime bladder control to not fully mature until ages 3-6 years.  It is recommended to wait for signs of your child staying dry at naps and overnight before considering nighttime potty training.

It is also not recommended to wake your child during the night to use the bathroom unless your pediatrician recommends doing so or if your child is older (5-7 years). A Dr. Chang adds, ”waking a child to use the bathroom is not very effective because once the parents stop waking up the children, they will go back to wetting the bed.”

A child’s nighttime sleep is extremely important and using a pull-up at night until they are developmentally ready for nighttime potty training is an easy solution realizing that they may be older before they are ready to stay dry all night or get up to use the bathroom. Be patient for their readiness and don’t sweat it!

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If you believe you and your child is ready for night time potty training you will want to follow the following steps.

As mentioned earlier, a child typically develops the ability to stay dry all night between the ages of 3-5.  Be watchful during this time period for signs of readiness, such as staying dry during naps and overnight.  If the ability to stay dry during these times doesn’t occur between 3-5, check with your pediatrician.  Some children have sensory issues and the ability to stay dry may be delayed and use of pull-ups at night may be extended.

When you see multiple dry diapers this is your window of opportunity to begin nighttime potty training. You will want to stop using diapers or pull-ups at this time because if they are available your child will choose to use them rather than staying dry. You don’t want that bad habit to start.

Some of you may have used the “bare-bottom” method for daytime potty training. If you did, continue this method into the nighttime potty training. Put your child to bed with a bare bottom with an oversized teeshirt.  The feeling of having something on may trigger your child to pee at night, even if underwear.  Remember, they are sleeping and the feeling of something there to catch their pee may cause them to pee. Bare bottom is best.

Because your child is in bed with a bare bottom, you will want to put a mattress protector on your child’s bed as there may be accidents.  In addition, you may want to place washable towels, blankets or waterproof pad underneath them.  There are pads that are soft and comfortable on one side and plastic and waterproof on the opposite side and easy to wash. These are ideal.  Due to the plastic waterproof side, these pads tend to stay in place. If there is an accident during the night, you can remove the wet pad, replace with another and the bed will still be dry.

At the time of nighttime potty training, you will want your child in a bed that your child can get in and out of easily.  You do not want your child in a crib where they are confined to the crib.  In addition, you may want to set-up a potty chair next to the bed for easy and quick access.

During daytime potty training it is recommended to pay attention to diet and fluids so that your child pees and poops easily.  When nighttime potty training you will want to limit the amount of fluid that your child drinks right before bedtime. Be sure after drinking fluids your child pees before crawling into bed.

Talk to your child about going bare bottom at night and not using pull-ups or diapers at night anymore because they are ready and staying dry.  Explain to them that they will pee right before going to bed to get rid of fluids so they can sleep.  Discuss what to do if they feel the need to pee at night and show them that their potty chair is nearby.  It would include a nightlight near their potty chair so that they can easily see.  It is not recommended to wake your child to pee at night but rather let them manage their own needs and let them sleep.

Be patient, celebrate dry nights, and don’t make a big deal of nighttime accidents.  Just clean up the accident and move on. Try again.  In time, there will be more dry nights than nights with accidents.  If the signs are there for developmental readiness the process should go well!

Remember that children are unique and one plan does not work for all.  Design the plan that works for you and your child. 

 

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Note: Yes, You Can!, manual written by Megan Pierson M.A. at Toddler Shop was used as a resource in this blog post. This manual will be available for purchase on The Potty Fairy website.  Please read further if you are interested in information regarding potty training and toddler sleep from Megan.

“Yes, You Can! “Potty Training / ToddlerSleep Manual

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“Yes, You Can”  manual is a Pediatrician and Urologist backed, easy-to-follow 3-4 day complete potty training guide, covering signs of readiness, how to prepare your home, days 1-3 of potty training, potty training charts, follow up recommendations, and certificates of achievement for your child.

I believe that sleep should never be compromised during the potty training process, so I have created a customizable visual nighttime chart as a fun and effective tool for you to implement with your toddler.

Contact me today at for all your toddler needs (potty, sleep, behavior). www.sleepshopoc.com/TODDLERSHOP or email me at megansleepshopoc@gmail.com and let’s get your little one potty trained and sleeping.

The Potty Fairy 2nd edition book is available in hardcover, softcover, and all e-book formats.  Available in English and coming soon in French and Spanish versions too!

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Watch for release in May 8  2018!

Copyright 2018